Dog Tales

Written by Fidgit

When I first began planning this walk, believing full well no human would be nutty enough to join, I had planned to get a dog. At first I thought to adopt and bring one from home. Then, recognizing the logistics of that, I thought I might pick one up down here. Emails and advice began pouring in from strangers on breed and training. I got pretty jazzed on the whole idea.
Continue reading

Economics of a ‘Bloqueo’

Written by Fidgit

Crossing Bolivia we found only a few trails, some back roads, a lot of railroad, and a long stretch along Ruta 1 from Uyuni to La Paz, so not much navigation was required. After the “brain drain” we experienced in the first season of walking, my perspective on using audio devices while hiking shifted, and my little mp3 device has become a regular piece of kit. Along this stretch, I kept my mind engaged and fed with podcasts.
Continue reading

Border Crossing: Bolivia into Peru Along the Ruta De Los Tres Cordilleras

Haz clic aquí para leer en español

Written by Neon

1

Coming into Caja Cachi

As we had planned this route from La Paz, we knew we were going to have to do something different at the border crossing. The way we wanted to go along the Ruta De Los Tres Cordilleras did not have any border crossing stations. To solve this, we planned on doing what the bike packers had done originally – go off trail to Puerto Acosta and get our passports stamped. Then to go into Tilali, Peru and get our passport stamped in before we’re actually in the country. It sounds kind of confusing and overwhelming. In the end it wasn’t too much hassle. Here’s the story:
Continue reading

Adventuring: . . . Sometimes it Sucks

Haz clic aquí para leer en español

P1000888

My hiking shirt just before one of the sleeves ripped off, causing underarm chaffing, and had to be retired.

*Part 2*
Read Part 1 Here

Our shoes are cracked and breaking open, as are our lips.  The bruises on our hips and the mold in our drinking hoses seem to be permanent. Our clothes and spirits sag from constant and demanding use. We have retired pieces which did not hold up to the test, from shirts to relationships. Continue reading

Bolivia: Cultural Memory and Lessons Ahead

Haz clic aquí para leer en español

In many cases Bolivia seems to have grasped the concept of modern development but missed the point. Seeing Bolivians riding motorcycles on narrow and winding mountain roads with a full face helmet cocked back and perched on their forehead. Walking up to a fast food counter and ordering, then waiting 30 minutes for a chicken sandwich. Drivers stopping at a red light to make sure no one is coming from the opposite direction before driving through. Or, wiping the spoon before eating out of a grubby metal bowl.
Continue reading

La Paz to Sorata: Crossing the Cordillera Real

Haz clic aquí para leer en español

*Written by Neon*

We resupplied in La Paz and went out to a small outpost of Milluni, nestled near the base of Cerro Huayna Potosi- a towering mountain skirted with glaciers. Leaving Milluni, we immediately began our ascent to our first pass in the Cordillera Real. Beginning at an elevation of around 4,000 meters, we ascended for half the day up to around 5,100 meters and crossed over into the next valley. Descending to a small group of huts, we realized it was a refugio area and ate a snack in the shelter of the small buildings. As we left our refuge, the wind died down and the hail began. Thankfully we were prepared. The hail died down and we marched on along the valley to find camp for the night. We ended up following an aqueduct to a group of ponds and set up our tent between a couple of them to tuck in for the night.
Continue reading

Bolivia: Mountains as a Food Desert

Haz clic aquí para leer en español

Written by Fidgit

I am by no means a health or nutrition person. I love sugar and all things unhealthy, I try to get as many calories as possible when long walking and that is about the extent of it. This is to say, It takes a lot to get me to notice nutritional health issues. Walking across Bolivia we not only witnessed but experienced the effects of lack of basic and essential dietary needs.
Continue reading

Bolivia: A Mining Story

Haz clic aquí para leer en español

Written by Fidgit

It was around midnight, we were hitching back to town from a day of roadwalking and were picked up by a mine truck driver. “When they can, families delay sending their boys into the mines until we have graduated from secondary school,” he peers ahead into the darkness across the comically large steering wheel of the semi,  “because once you start going under ground, you only have 10 or 20 good years of life left. But most go underground around the age of 15 because their family needs the money.”

“It is the breathing that kills them, the mines give us masks but after a while, the men quit wearing them, they get in the way.” Continue reading